Harbour Return: Legacy Project

har·​bour | \ ˈhär-bər  \

Definition of harbour

: a place of security and comfort : REFUGE

Harbour Return is an inclusive legacy song writing project offered by Soul Sounds Music Therapy. This project is designed for those nearing end-of-life and/or those experiencing grief or loss.

The hope of Harbour Return is to encapsulate a moment in time, and create a meaningful legacy that will be cherished forever. In times of grief and loss, we hope that this song can bring comfort, refuge, and remembrance.


Background

As summarized by Louise Cardin (2006), “legacy work is the process of creatively expressing and documenting one’s life, with the goal of leaving the legacy for future generations.” Legacy songs can help express and communicate one’s experience, and find meaning and purpose to end-of-life, and loss.

The creation of Harbour Return is inspired by Lizzy’s own experience of loss, and desire to hold space for everyone impacted by bereavement. You can read more about the inspiration behind this project in our blog post titled Harbour Return: Legacy Project.

Process

Each song is created in collaboration with the client and/or loved one(s). The process is personalized to support, and hold true to a person’s legacy and integrity. Harbour Return projects will often follow this sequence, however each project is unique.

  • A 1 hour recorded interview/music therapy session with Lizzy. This session will guide the song creation, and can include all participants.
  • Lizzy will then take this information and the recording to create a song (with voice, guitar, and/or piano).
  • Once the song is completed, Lizzy will welcome an opportunity to share the song in person with those who wish to be present.
  • To conclude the Legacy Project, you will receive:
    • A recording of the song by Lizzy
    • A recording of the song incorporating clips from the interview
    • Framed printed lyrics

Cadrin, M. L. (2006). Music therapy legacy work in palliative care: Creating meaning at end of life. Canadian Journal of Music Therapy12(1), 109–138.